Men’s Hair Loss

The Norwood Scale, sometimes referred to as the Norwood Hamilton Scale or the Norwood Scale of Male Pattern Hair Loss, is a measure of the extent of hair loss in men. Over the years it has been adopted as the industry standard classification of genetic pattern hair loss, and is used to assess candidacy for hair transplant surgery, as well as in the drafting of quotations.

norwood_fig1

Class 2 & 2A

hair loss chart

The first “Classes” of hair loss are represented at left. Most men will become affected by either stage in their lifetime. In the top image, the hair line starts to recede and a “widow’s peak” above the temples is evident. In the second image, the hairline starts to recede farther back from the front and begins to “catch up” with the widow’s peak. Not evident in this picture, but to some of our clients, is that the hair on the back of the head is becoming thinner as the hair follicles become weaker and fall out.

Class 3, 3A, 3V

hair_loss_chart

In Norwood Scale Class 3 (includes 3 Anterior, 3 Vertex) of this chart, men notice a more significant decline in hair above the temples as well as receding from the forehead. Hair loss is also starting to become signicant on the crown or vertex (bottom image). See our Before/After Hair Transplant Gallery to see an HRC patient with similar hair loss who was treated.

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Class 4 & 4A

hair_loss_chart4

In class 4 and 4A (anterior), hair loss may become more noticeable on the crown, or patients may have only significant loss from above the temples and frontal anterior area (bottom photo). See our Before/After Hair Transplant Gallery to see an HRC patient with similar hair loss who was treated.

Class 5, 5A, 5V

hair_loss_chart3

By Class 5, 5A (anterior, middle) and 5V (vertex, bottom), hair loss is approaching significant levels, with most of it disappearing on the top of the vertex and crown. By these stages, more hair grafts will be needed to provide both coverage and density. See our Before/After Hair Transplant Gallery to see an HRC patient with similar hair loss who was treated.

Class 6 & 7

hair_loss_chart5

Class 6, top, hair loss is major but there still is donor hair available to use for hair transplants. See our Before/After Hair Transplant Gallery to see an HRC patient with similar hair loss who was treated.

By the final and worst stage of hair loss, (and not all men reach this stage), hair loss is severe and a suitable donor area is almost nil.